On Moving to New York

theessentialman:

Anonymous Asked: You read a lot from bloggers who advocate just “going for it” with regards to making life-altering moves such as relocating to a major city. I like the sentiment, but realistically, what are the bare essentials someone should have (financially, vocationally, etc.) if they want to move to NYC and not be living on the streets within a few months?

First, I want you to know that moving to New York means you have to come to terms with these things:

1. You will get less space for a lot of money. Yeah, you can get a huge house in Utah for the price of a studio apartment in New York, but you’ll be in Utah, not New York.
2. You will probably live with a roommate or two (or three) if you want to spend less than $1,000/month.
3. Manhattan is overrated. Brooklyn is gorgeous and getting up early and dealing with a late train or two is worth saving $300+/month on rent.
4. Don’t get a broker. I made that mistake with my first place and overpaid my move by $1900.00. 

So, in my opinion bare minimum hustle skills to move to New York and not be homeless.

Your stuff: Sell it all. Make a website proclaiming you’re moving to New York. I did (back on my xanga days) and came with a bag of clothes and my laptop. This will also save you money on moving crap here that you probably can’t put anywhere in the first place. Cost: 0

Plane Ticket: I’ve mastered the art of traveling cheap, and the trick is either buy a ticket 8 weeks in advance or last minute (24 hours or less before you fly out). My last trip to Paris was $440.00 US round trip. And the last time I flew to California from NY was $180.00 Round Trip. It helps to call someone or go straight to the desk, they can usually squeeze you in somewhere. Cost: $200

Apartment: You can find a nice place in Brooklyn and even Manhattan with roommates for $800-$900/month. So assuming you will be required to do a deposit, that’s at least $1600.00 for your move in. Cost: $1600

Transportation: You’ll want an Unlimited Monthly Metro card, which is $89.00. Cost: $89.00

So we’re looking at about $1600 to settle into your new place, and to be safe let’s add on 2 months rent in the bank for a total of $3200.00. Plus 2 more months of Metro cards at $178.  So to survive your first three months if I were you, I’d want at least $3380.00 in the bank in my opinion.

And I think three months is more than enough time to find a job and get a positive income flow to keep you housed, clothes and fed. But as beam_ad on Twitter suggested, it would be less scary if you had a job lined up already.

Any New Yorkers out there like to chime in?


Reblogged from peternyc with 77 notes

More On Happiness

theessentialman:

Allen and Violet Large, both in their 70s, won $11.2 million in the July 14 Lotto 649 draw, but instead of spending their new found fortune on lavish gifts they decided to hand it over to friends, charities and hospitals.

“What you’ve never had, you never miss,” Violet, 78, told the Canadian Press.

“We were pretty well set, not millionaires, but comfortable,” said Allen.

After friends and family were taken care of, a large amount of the winnings were donated to hospitals where Violet had been undergoing cancer treatment. Funds were also handed out to the couple’s local fire department, churches and cemeteries, the Red Cross, the Salvation Army.

“It made us feel good,” said Violet. “And there’s so much good being done with that money.”

“That money that we won was nothing,” Allen added. “We have each other.”

Reblogged from peternyc with 142 notes

Originality

theessentialman:

theyounggentleman:

Do not go out of your way to be original/different. That defeats the purpose and is obnoxious.

People are obsessed with being individuals now. But you are not an individual or different when you are doing the same thing that everyone else is.

A gentleman is original because he is naturally different than everyone around him. But that doesn’t matter, it is a side effect and not the goal.

Being yourself is original enough, going out of your way to try to be someone you’re not is just ridiculous. The people who you see walking around, choosing clothing to make themselves seem angry, picking fights where they don’t see issues, and doing things purposefully to cause issues, are not original they are annoying pests in society. The same can be said for anyone else who looks to attract attention merely by being “strange.” It’s not about being strange, it’s about being you.

Be different by being yourself. Stop going against the grain just to stand out. You attract more positive attention when you act on what you truly feel rather than acting on what you think others will notice.

-The Young Gentleman

Reblogged from peternyc with 76 notes

theessentialman:

“Sometimes, when we’re lying together, I look at her and I feel dizzy with the realization that here is another distinct person from me, who has memories, origins, thoughts, feelings that are different from my own. That tension between familiarity and mystery meshes something strong between us. Even if one builds a life together based on trust, attentiveness and mutual support, I think that it’s important that a partner continues to surprise.”

Barack Obama being legit as fuck. Excuse my language, but this is a great way to start a Monday.

(Source: lemonde.fr)

Reblogged from peternyc with 676 notes

On the Art of Wearing Clothes

theessentialman:

When my first serious girlfriend in New York and I were together, we decided to have a date night at this little restaurant in the West Village. I did the usual, checked to see if we still had reservations, re-pressed my new Thom Browne button up shirt and did a last minute check on the weather.

“40% chance of rain.” I told her, “Should we bring an umbrella just in case?”

She assured me it wasn’t necessary and we left.

After dinner the inevitable happened. It rained. Noah’s Ark type rain. And luck would have it that I decided to wear a leather jacket that night as well.

One thing you will learn about the West Village is that not only are the streets a maze to navigate, but there are absolutely no taxis within a 10-mile radius.

We ran through the streets, her covering herself with her coat. Me, desperately looking for an awning to protect my new, extremely expensive outfit.

By the end of the night, we were both soaked and I was carrying her on my back, gentlemanly allowing myself to ruin my dress shoes by stepping through the vast pools of water until we finally flagged down a taxi.

When we got back to my apartment in Noho I took off my jacket to find that I was now covered in gray blobs. My leather jacket had bled, bled all over my new $300.00 dress shirt. I rushed to the bathroom to try and salvage it but every home remedy in the book proved useless.

I was upset. We argued. I blamed her for convincing me we didn’t need an umbrella. She offered to buy me a new shirt, but in the end I proclaimed it was alright and the now tie-dyed number was laid to rest in the darkest part of my closet.

In retrospect, I did a silly, stupid, but not uncommon thing.

When I recall this memory, no longer is it a beautiful image of me in love, running through the streets of New York in the rain with a beautiful girl.  The memory is now of us, in my apartment, arguing over clothes. And when I pulled that shirt out from my closet for the last time after we had broken up, I didn’t see that image of her riding piggyback as I navigated over puddles, but of me hunched over my bathroom sink, pouring copious amounts of Oxyclean on the stains.

I can’t speak for previous generations for obvious reasons, but when I hear stories today about grown men getting into fist fights because one man stepped on another man’s brand new sneakers, I can’t help but think.

In 20, 30 years, if your son were to find those same pair of shoes in your closet, is a story of you fighting another man because he happened to put his foot on your foot in passing something you would be proud to tell?

In these economic times I can certainly understand wanting to take care of possessions you spend money on, but I would certainly give all the money in the world to erase that little part of my story if it meant I would one day give my son the stained dress shirt. And tell him the story of how his father was once madly in love in New York.


A man wearing his father’s 35 year old suit (via The Sartorialist)

There’s something magical when you see something like a man wearing his father’s tattered suit. Not only do you want to know about that man, but you want to know about his father and his father’s story of that suit. Wear clothes like you actually live life. Don’t treat them as if you are a curator of a museum.



That’s soul right there.

Reblogged from peternyc with 332 notes

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Booze nd Monster! =]: WAKE UP IN THE MORNING FEELING LIKE A HIPSTER. PUT ON MY GLASSES AND MY PLAID SHIRT IM GUNNA CHECK MY FLICKR. BEFORE I LEAVE GRAB MY TRIANGLE AND MY CAMERA BAG CUZ WHEN I LEAVE FOR THE FOREST I AIN’T COMING BACK. IM TAKING DREAMY VINTAGE PHOTOS, WEARING INDIE CLOTHES CLOTHES, SARCASM BLOWING UP OUR CONVOS. DROP TOPPIN PLAYING OUR FAVORITE PLAYLISTS, BAD GRAMMAR GETTING US REALLY PISSED PISSED, TRYING TO GET ON THE RECOMMENDED BLOGS LIST. DON’T STOP MAKE IT POP HANG YOUR DREAMCATCHER UP, TONIGHT IMA FIGHT ANONS TILL THE SUNLIGHT. TIK TOK ON THE CLOCK BUT THE REBLOGGING NEVER STOPS NO OH OH OH, NO OH OH OH.

 

Reblogged from nicolattex3 with 2 notes